Conquer your dev toolchain in 'Classic' SharePoint – Part 4

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For this last post I want to take what we’ve learned and add the final pieces that have you creating web parts in the same way you would modern SPFx web parts and solutions. We’re going to start by discussing TypeScript and then briefly touch on Sass and how to include these languages into your new Webpack/Gulp environment. TypeScript is becoming almost ubiquitous in modern web development. The pros are numerous, my favorites are the ability to write code to target older browser with modern capabilities, and the ability to use a version of intellisense to validate your objects properties and methods. [Read More]

Conquer your dev toolchain in 'Classic' SharePoint - Part 3

In our last post I went through the gulp process we were implementing to watch our files and upload them into an appropriate SharePoint library so that we can test our work inside SharePoint regardless of if SharePoint was version 2007 or SharePoint Online. Now we’re going to take things further and formalize our process. One of the tools the SharePoint Framework (SPFx) uses is Webpack. Webpack’s main goal is to take the many files that you create as a developer and bundle them all together into one JavaScript file. [Read More]

Conquer your dev toolchain in 'Classic' SharePoint - Part 2

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In the first post in this series I discussed some of the benefits of formalizing your client-side development process and then a bit about starting the process of tooling up. A common scenario to develop our own client-side solutions in SharePoint is to point a Content Editor (CEWP) or Script Editor (SEWP) web part at our custom html, css, and js files that are sitting in a document library somewhere in our environment. [Read More]

Conquer your dev toolchain in 'Classic' SharePoint - Part 1

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Last year, around this time, Marc and I agreed we should write a blog series on our development process. As often happens good intentions get buried in other commitments, but I’ve finally managed to circle back on this topic which I’m finding has become more important than ever. Over the last year the SharePoint Framework has taken off. Although it still doesn’t support the paradigm that I most often am developing for - the full-page app hosted in SharePoint - I still think it’s a great model for development. [Read More]

SharePoint REST Date/Time Updates

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A recent comment on my blog post “SharePoint time, is not your time, is not their time.” has prompted me to create a short addendum post that specifically references updates and how your thinking might differ from displaying SharePoint date/time values. To recap our example, I was discussing how to manipulate the date values to have your client-side code mimic (or not) the regional settings of your SharePoint site. The question was raised about how to deal with dates when doing POST to a SharePoint list or library from your client-side code. [Read More]

SharePoint time, is not your time, is not their time.

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If you develop client side solutions for SharePoint you’ve either run into this or you will run into the following scenario. SharePoint stores all its date/time fields in UTC time. The site collections, sites, and the users, can have their own time zone settings. If you’re using SharePoint out of the box because all the content is rendered on the server and pushed to the client with all the date/time translation has been done for you. [Read More]

Code Creep - SharePoint "CDN"

Centralizing your SharePoint client side code “Code Creep”… no it’s not the latest thriller movie out of Hollywood, although it probably could be. I’m referring to the sprawl of client side code files that are stored when implementing client side web parts or “widgets” in SharePoint. A common solution for implementing “widgets” in SharePoint is to store the files in a document library, linking to them with a CEWP that will then run and render your “widget”. [Read More]

Widget Wrangler Webcast and New Release

This content has also been posted on Bob German's Vantage Point. Widget Wrangler Webcast and New Release Here’s a quick update on the Widget Wrangler – the light-weight JavaScript framework that helps you build flexible widgets that can be used in SharePoint content editor web parts, add-in parts, or really pretty much everywhere. The Widget Wrangler was featured in a webcast on Channel 9 today. The Office team’s Vesa Juvonen interviewed WW creators Julie Turner and Bob German, who explained the framework and demonstrated how to use it with AngularJS, jQuery, and plain old JavaScript. [Read More]

Flexible SharePoint Development with Widget Wrangler

This content has also been posted on Bob German's Vantage Point. What’s a widget, and why should I care? In economics, a widget is a name for a generic gadget or manufactured good; on the web, a widget is a generic piece of web functionality running on a page. What makes widgets special is that, unlike controls in ASP.NET or directives in AngularJS, widgets are generally released separately from the web page that hosts them, and are often deployed by end users. [Read More]

Future Proof - Javascript Dashboard Code Samples

To support my colleague Bob German and his great talk on Future Proofing your SharePoint solutions I helped him by building a SharePoint charting dashboard that used client side scripting libraries to pull data from a SharePoint list and display it using commercially available client side charting library. He has asked me to share those solutions and so finally here they are. I really appreciate all of Bob’s great feedback and hope these examples can help people out there get started on building their own dashboards. [Read More]